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20130124
20130201
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
the balance is right in so many areas of the european union has legislated, including environment, social affairs and crime. nothing should be off the table. my fourth principle of democratic accountability. we need to have a bigger and more significant role for national powers. there is not parliaments that will remain the true source of legitimacy. it is angela merkel has to answer to the great parliament that antonio samaras has to pass measures and i must account on the e.u. budget negotiations come to safeguarding single market. they still and proper respect even fear it to national leaders that we need to recognize that properly on the way the e.u. does business. this principle is fearless. whatever the abridgment are enacted for the euro zone, they must work fairly for those countries inside it or outside it. that will be of particular importance to britain. we are not going to join the single currency, that there is no overwhelming economic region should share the same boundary anymore then the single market. our ability to help set its rules as the principal reason for membership
is what the environment was about, was led by teddy roosevelt. it was embraced by men like russell train, great republicans. it was a terrific republican sense of leadership. nelson rockefeller. >> how about richard nixon? >> richard nixon. the clean air act. the man who took the lead out of the air. richard m. nixon. the man who saved the waters of this country, richard m. nixon. the last great liberal president this country had. i just would like to see this rise above this petty, partisan bickering that i heard somewhere in this panel. >> this is all part of the speech, laid out, the thing that we at least have to do with. the things the government has to be involved in. the air, the water goes from state to state, city to city. one place cannot do it. it has to be -- the regulation of how to deal with protecting all of that has to be the business of the federal government. >> can i get half a minute of rebuttal here? cap and trade work well for acid rain. acid rain stays in our country. i am not against regulated carbon. if you can get china and india to do something. if they don't,
developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> our second story "outfront", a dire warning. this from britain's chief medical officer. the threat from drug-resistant bacteria is so serious that it could trigger a national emergency, similar to a terrorist attack. some pretty stunning words and it sure caught my attention, and "outfront" tonight, we're lucky to have dr. oz, host of "the dr. oz show." i've always wondered, people who go to the doctor every time they get sick and get antibiotics, are they causing a problem? are we going to have all these things be resistant to antibiotics? is she exaggerating? >> she's not exaggerating. i'm very concerned about this. the real question is what can we do about it? the reality is, we can't keep up with the bacteria. they're going to change much more rapidly than we develop new medications at the current pace, as we ta
area, have appreciated the goals of our environment and climate change and doing everything that we can. i think the 80%, we're not going to be satisfied with that, spencer. we want 100% zero waste. this is where we're going. >> reporter: is that possible? >> i think it is. it is possible. >> reporter: san francisco residents sven eberlein and debra baida think it's possible, too. they are avid recyclers and composters, so much so that they produce almost no trash. baida lists what goes into the compost bin. >> we put wrappers from our butter, we put any meat or package, that kind of packaged paper food, soiled food wrappings, tissues, q-tips, paper napkins, which we don't have in our home. if those come in, those go there. soiled paper plates, milk cartons. >> i go to travel somewhere, and i'm, you know, i have, like, an apple and "where's the compost?" you know, and i have to throw it in the trash, and it kind of, you know, it just doesn't feel quite right, you know. >> reporter: but not all san franciscans are as enthusiastic as eberlein and baida. those who refuse to sort their garb
to a changing political environment." >> first of all, on that comment, it is deeply offensive. democrats did the same thing in 2008. i believe andrew cuomo may have said the same thing in 2008, and he was -- >> got a pass. >> yeah. he was not hammered as much. >> he got hammered for that? i read that someone got a pass for it. >> some have gotten a pass. anyway, i think cuomo got hammered pretty hard. but this is -- i saw, richard haass, mr. i'm not going to speculate on anything that's not in front of my nose, you know, this is important. this is an important story because the guy who has been the de facto leader of the republican party over the past four years since george w. bush left town is roger els. he's run the party, he's run the conservative movement. when roger els decides she's not worth the trouble, then that means that conservatism's moving in a new direction. i talked about what happened this weekend at "the national review" institute's talk. i was really surprised. really surprised by what i heard. and heartened, whether it was bill kristol or john hatoritz. also scott walker
across the country. and i think what they've gotten used to is an environment where they could get away with these things and no one would really make note but that has changed. 2011 was a bad year, a landmark year in a bad way in that we saw the largest number of restrictions on women's reproductive rights pass in state legislatures across the country and the response to that has been a backlash and a lot more attention paid to the type of legislation like what you're talking about here. so they're not going to be able to get away with it anymore. >> ari, you're a lawyer. i mean, what are these people suggesting? that somehow the woman who has already been the victim of a sexual assault should keep the child as evidence of the original crime? >> well, sb 206, this bill, is basically trying to read in an attack on abortion into the laws of evidence and preserving or tampering with evidence which can be a heavily restricted in the criminal context. i don't think the law is -- the legislation here is as bad as people said. it refers to an intent to destroy, quote, evidence of the crime. a
're actually o-- things could be worse, in the environment in the united states. and that always ends with the punch line, and sure enough things got worse, here we are. >> but to explain, and for purposes we ran a experiment, an some countries didn't. >> and up to that point, the track of recovery had been about the same in the u.s. and britain. since then, we've started to recover, and they are in a recession. >> thank you for joining us. >> all right, we'll be right back with a rachel maddow show, bullpucky alert, this proves to be a real life pile of bull. hold on. blac girl: ok. dad: you look so pretty. ♪ i'm overprotective. that's why i got a subaru. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. every signature is unique, and every fingerprint unrepeatable. at sleep number, we recognize the incredible diversity
-style austerity and have bad money the way they did. we're actually -- things could be worse, in the environment in the united states. and that always ends with the punch line, and sure enough things got worse, here we are. >> but to explain, and for purposes we ran a experiment, an some countries didn't. >> and up to that point, the track of recovery had been about the same in the u.s. and britain. since then, we've started to recover, and they are in a recession. >> thank you for joining us. >> all right, we'll be right back with a rachel maddow show, bullpucky alert, this proves to be a real life pile of bull. hold on. is bigger than we think ... sometimelike the flu.fer from with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days.
them? >> yes, spencer, we actually do. not only does our department of the environment go out and do audits, we actually have auditors that go out there and make sure that we're all in compliance with the way we measure it, and using the state standards and the state process to do it. >> reporter: so there's no doubt in your mind that the 80% is real. >> oh, no doubt at all, no doubt at all in my mind. >> reporter: whatever the actual number is, recycling and composting don't come free. >> all of the services we provide are paid for by the customers whose material we're taking away. >> reporter: are they paying more in rates because of all this recycling and composting than they would otherwise? >> i would bet they're paying a little more. but if you compare rates in the bay area-- san francisco versus other communities-- we're right in the middle of the pack. and we're doing a lot more recycling than any other communities. >> reporter: residents currently pay about $28 a month for their trash bins; recycling and composting bins are free. but last month, recology requested a rate inc
to keep the cement floors warm for man's best friend. >> it's a stressful environment. we're trying to keep them as comfortable as we can. >> reporter: outside pittsburgh, when a water main broke in the middle of the night, single digit temperatures turned gushing water into a sheet of ice. subzero temps aren't all bad if you like ice boating. skimming across the ice at speeds up to 60 miles an hour in what looks like a mini kayak with a sail. for those who have to work outside -- >> as long as i bundle up really like double bundle, i'm good. i have a lot of clothes on. >> reporter: maybe the best way to get by is thinking hot. >> key largo is a great place this time of year. >> reporter: and the forecast high there today, 77 degrees. now, by contrast, in gaithersburg, maryland, yesterday dangerous for a cell phone worker who was up on a tower about 200 feet high when all of a sudden his hands went numb, his legs cramped up and a co-worker had to climb up to rescue him. he was treated at the hospital for hypothermia, but he'll be okay, so be careful out there. soledad. >> my goodnes
. >> it is a stressful environment. we are trying to keep them as comfortable. >> reporter: outside pittsburgh when a water main broke single digit temperature turned gushing water into a sheet of ice. skimming across the ice at speeds of up to 60 miles per hour in what looks like a mini kayak with a sail. for those who have to work outside -- >> as long as i bundle up i am good. >> reporter: maybe the best way to get by is thinking hot. >> key largo is a great place this time of year. >> how are you doing out there? 19 degrees i understand in new york? >> reporter: that's right with a wind chill of about 8. they have set up warming centers here in new york city because it is very serious, this cold for those who are vulnerable, the very young and very old. if you are hearty enough to come out you have a lot of people out here taking photographs of the fountain here in bryant park where -- because they think it looks cool to get this effect, they have heaters which keep the pipes warm and allow them to keep it flowing. you see the effect. nice icicles. you have to make sure to put the layers on if
part of my state are still not living in a security environment. we owe them that. at the same time, i think more and more americans are agreeing these 11 million people need to come out of the shadows and we need to give them a path to citizenship but not favoritism. >> senator mccain, you're exactly right. the polls are showing the majority of americans do support the type of proposal you and chuck schumer are putting forward. what would you say to conservative house republicans that will call anything you try to pat in t-- pass in the senat amnesty. >> i think we will and already are reaching across to our friendson the otherside talking and i think they realize the realities of the 21st century and there will be some difficulties and it's long hard path. i'm confident we will succeed. >> senator shuman, willie geist in new york, good to see you this morning. there's a piece in the "new york times" where a reporter goes to a diner in south carolina. the concern down there is people are being rewarded for illegal behavior, a, and b, being given priority over workers in america who ca
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)